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Portrait of department coordinator Dr. Saghafi

Dr. Cyrus Saghafi

Program Coordinator*

Contact for Department:
cyrus.saghafi@gcccd.edu
phone: (619) 660-4243

 
FACULTY

Surveying

Surveyors are involved in land surveying, route surveying, construction surveying, photogrammetry, mapping, global positioning systems, geographical information systems, and other areas of property description and measurements. The surveying curriculum provides training in the many of these areas.

Course work includes the communication and computational skills required for boundary, construction, route, and control surveying, photogrammetry, topography, drainage, surveying law, and subdivision design, with specific emphasis upon applications of electronic data collection and related software including CADD. Graduates should qualify for jobs as party chief, instrument person, surveying technician, highway surveyor, mapper, GPS technician, and CADD operator. Graduates will be prepared to pursue the requirements necessary to become a Registered Land Surveyor in California.

Accuracy is a must! The public and the government require that surveys be accurate and precise. Math skills are vital to success in this profession. Most surveys involve computations, using algebra and trigonometry.

Upon completion of the Surveying Technology program at Cuyamaca College a student receives a 2-year AAS degree; Associate in Applied Science. Upon graduation, you would have two choices

  • Begin working in your career field or
  • Continue your education by pursuing a
    BS degree in technology at a four-year institution.
This is a two-year degree. Some students require a few remedial courses in Math and English and, therefore, may take an extra semester or two to complete the program.


The surveying technician must have the following skills upon graduation in order to gain successful employment in various areas.

  • Manual drafting skills
  • Computer-Assisted Drafting skills
  • Field use of surveying equipment
  • Ability to read and interpret drawings and maps
  • Ability to prepare maps and plats
  • Ability to write simple property descriptions
  • Understanding of NC surveying regulations
  • Ability to perform complex surveying computations

Career Technical Education

This web site is supported by Carl D. Perkins VTEA IC funds through the System. Office, California Community Colleges,
Grant #08-C01-020

Revised  April 30, 2010
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