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 Soc 120

SOCIOLOGY 120: Schedule

SOCIOLOGY 120: Syllabus

 


Sociology 120 Syllabus SAMPLE 

Cuyamaca College

El Cajon, California 

Instructor, Dr. Botz

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

SOCIOLOGY 120: Introductory Sociology

Syllabus Quick Links: 
 
[Course Description]  [Required Publications and Supplies]  [Course Objectives
 [Methodology, Expectations, and Requirements]  [Attendance]  [Student Code of Conduct]  [Course Materials
 [Grade Determination]  [Class Sessions and Reading  Schedule]  [Final Exam]  [Dates to Remember]

 

COURSE SYLLABUS

Class Sessions: Thursdays, 6:30 pm to 9:20 pm

Location: E-106 Course Length: 16 Weeks

Course Description: Sociology 120: Introductory Sociology: 
Study of the nature of social life, the dynamics of human interaction, symbolic foundation of behavior, social organization and control, social change and the tools of sociological investigation.  Three Units; three hours lecture; no prerequisites
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Required Publications and Supplies 

Textbook:
Gelles, R.J. and Levine, A. Sociology An Introduction, (6th edition).  McGraw Hill, Inc., New York: New York: 1999
Textbook Study Guide:
Thompson, K. Study Guide to Accompany Gelles and Levine: Sociology an Introduction, 6thMcGraw Hill, Inc., New York: New York, 1999 edition.  
Collateral Reading:
Macionis, J. J., Benokraitis, N.   Seeing Ourselves: Classic, Contemporary, and Cross-Cultural Readings in Sociology, Third Edition.  Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs: New Jersey, 1995

Scantron Forms: Scantron form (882ES) for all quizzes and exams. You will need a scantron the SECOND week of classes, there are weekly reading quizzes and three exams.

Three Ring Binder: There are lots and lots and lots of handouts.

The listed publications and supplies may be purchased at the Cuyamaca College Bookstore located next to the Coyote's Den across from the flagpole.  A portion of the Bookstore sales support Student Activities programs at Cuyamaca College.

Learning Resource Center Reserve Desk: A copy of the textbook (Sociology: An Introduction), study guide, and the collateral reading (Seeing Ourselves) are on reserve in the LRC.  
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Course Objectives:

1. To gain knowledge of sociology will lead to greater understanding, awareness and appreciation of one's society

2.  To develop scientific attitudes, thereby increasing a capacity for critical analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of relevant social phenomena

3.  To gain a knowledge of the social structures, functions, and processes which are found in all human societies as well as the range of cultural variability

4.  To understand the general structure and function of major social institutions, as well as the complex interactions between them, including recognition of processes resulting in social disorganization

5.  To appreciate the importance and value in the application of sociological knowledge, especially in one's day-to-day living
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Course Content:

1.  Sociology as a science: theories and methodology

2.  The society, culture and the individual: socialization, social interaction, social groups and deviance

3.  Social stratification and social inequality: social class, race and ethnicity, gender and age

4.  Social institutions: family, religion, education, political, economic and social orders

5.  Social change in the modern world
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Methodology, Expectations, and Requirements

Instructional Methods: This course will be taught using a variety of instructional methods including lectures, group activities, individual presentations, class discussions, reading assignments, class activities, videotapes and class handouts

Class Participation: The acquisition of a new information requires considerable thinking and reflecting.  Part of this process can include discussing and sharing the learnings that you are acquiring. Classroom activities will offer you an opportunity for these discussions and sharings.  It is expected that you will be prepared for the discussions and will participate in them to the best of your ability. Plus, it's fun and stimulating!

Class Discussion Guidelines: You will be encouraged to discuss your observations and personal experiences to the level of your personal comfort.  

These discussions are intended to help you understand the richness of diversity in our society and reach the course objective of gaining knowledge that will lead to greater understanding, awareness and appreciation of one's society.

In order to provide an appropriate environment for these discussions there is zero tolerance of deprecating and diminishing remarks based on ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, age or sexual orientation. Humor is a vital part of everyday life and thoroughly enjoyed by me.  Humor is not to be used in this class, however, to continue oppression of others.

Reading: The study and discussion of Sociology is wonderful! For the class to learn from and participate in the discussions, you will need to thoroughly read and understand your textbook and collateral reading.  Reading to learn takes concentration and effort. You are provided with a variety of materials to assist them in the reading process. All textbooks chapters 
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Attendance: You are expected to attend class and be on time.  One three hour evening class is the equivalent of an entire week of one hour day classes.  Attendance is related to course performance and the ability to take quizzes and other exams.  There are no make-up quizzes since you are allowed to drop your lowest quiz score.   In the event that you miss a class, you are responsible for obtaining the information and assignments missed from a fellow student and are responsible for knowing that information. You are responsible for having that information prior to the next class session so that you are prepared to take the quiz.

Roll will be taken, however, it is the your responsibility to make sure I know you are present In other words, my records will be used in determining attendance. If there is any question be please be sure you check with me before leaving class to make sure you are given credit for attending the session.  

In accordance with College Policy, you may be dropped for excessive absences and/or persistent tardiness.
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Student Code of Conduct: All students are expected to follow the Student Code of Conduct which relies on the personal honor and integrity of Cuyamaca College students and staff.  Obviously any student who engages in any dishonest behavior, including cheating or plagiarism, will be subject to disciplinary action.   In this class that also means receiving an "F" grade on the project or exam in question.  The student will be ineligible to attend the class session in which the misconduct occurs.

Course Materials: You are responsible for all reading assignments, lecture notes, and course handouts. During the "get-acquainted" session you will be asked to "make a friend" with whom you can exchange telephone numbers. In the unlikely event that you are absent, you should be sure to call your "friend" and ask him/her to take lecture notes for you and to pick up any handouts. This is important, we do not bring the previous week(s) handouts to class.
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Grading and Evaluation

Assignments: You will be assigned work in your Study Guides, and class handout readings

Weekly Quizzes. There will be weekly quizzes on the material learned in the previous week's lecture and activities. The quizzes will include material in the Student Study Guide and class handouts. Be sure to KEEP all your written quiz sheets and scantron forms until the final grades have been posted! Periodically you will receive a spreadsheet with your weekly quiz scores and exam. If there is an error you must show us your returned quizzes otherwise our records prevail.  DO NOT THROW OUT YOUR QUIZ SHEETS UNTIL THE FINAL GRADES HAVE BEEN FILED

First Exam.  The first exam will be on the material learned Weeks 1 through 5 including Chapters 1 through 7 in the textbook and Study Guide

Second Exam. The second exam will be on material learned in Weeks 6 through 11 including Chapters 8 through 12 in the textbook and Study Guide

Third Exam.  The third examination will be on material learned in Weeks 12 through 16 including Chapters 13 through 17 in the textbook and Study Guide.  The third exam will be given during Final Examinations week
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Grade Determination

Percentage of Total Grade

Quizzes 40 percent 

First Exam 20 percent

Second Exam 20 percent

Third Exam (Final Examination Week) 20 percent
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CLASS SESSIONS AND READING SCHEDULE

Spring Semester 2000: Thursdays, 7:00 pm to 9:50 pm

January 27 Course Overview

Topic: The Sociological Perspective

Science and Theory in Sociology

In-Class 

Reading Activity: Preview Study Guide

Homework: Reading Activity: Textbook Reconnaissance

Reading Activity: SQ4R Worksheet

Reading Activity: Chapters 1 and 2 Outline

Reading Gelles: Chapters 1 (The Sociological Perspective) 

Assignments: Chapter 2 (Science and Theory in Sociology) 

Macionis: Reading #1

C. Wright Mills: "The Promise of Sociology

Reading #2

Peter L. Berger: "Invitation to Sociology"

Reading #11

Marvin Harris: "India's Sacred Cow"

Study Guide: Thompson: Chapters 1, and 2
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February 3

Quiz 1: Chapters 1 (Sociological Perspective)

Chapter 2 (Science and Theory in Sociology)

Topic: Culture

In-Class 

Reading Activity: 

Review Quiz (Where was this found?)

Second Review of Syllabus (Where are we now?)

Read Around: Don't Blame Me! The New "Culture of Victimization"

Homework: Reading Activity: Chapter Preview Outline 

Reading Gelles: 

Assignments: Chapter 3 (Culture)

Chapter 4 (Socialization Through the Life Course)

Macionis: 

Reading #17

Mary E. Walsh: "Cognitive Development: Children's Understands of Homelessness"

Reading #18

Elijah Anderson: "Growing Up on the Streets"

Study Guide: Thompson: Chapter 3 (Culture)
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February 10 

Quiz 2: Chapter 3: Culture 

Topic: Socialization through the Life Course

In-Class 

Reading Activity: Review Quiz (Where was this found?)

Third Review of Syllabus (Where are we now?)

Homework: Reading Activity: Chapter Preview Outline 

Reading Gelles: 

Assignments: Chapter 5: Social Structure

Chapter 6: Social Interaction and Social Groups 

Macionis: 

Reading #21

Deborah Tannen, "You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation"

Reading #22

Marty Westerman. "The Death of the Frito Bandito"

Reading #24

Max Weber: "The Characteristics of Bureaucracy"

Reading #25

Sally Helgesen: "The Female Advantage"

Study Guide: Thompson: Chapter 4: Socialization Through the Life Course 
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February 17

Quiz 3: Chapter 4: Socialization Through the Life Course 

Topics: Social Structure

Social Interaction and Social Groups

In-Class 

Reading Activity: Sociocultural Evolution: A Summary (fill in the blanks)

Homework: Reading Activity: Chapter Preview Outlines

Reading Activity: Review Society Study Sheet 

Reading Gelles: 

Assignments: Chapter 7: Deviance and Social Control

Macionis: 

Reading #27

Emile Durkheim: "The Functions of Crime"

Reading #28

David L. Rosenhan: "On Being Sane in Insane Places

Reading #29

Elliott "Currie: "Crime in World Perspective"

Study Guide: Thompson:

Chapter 5: Social Structure

Chapter 6: Social Interaction & Social Groups 
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February 24

Quiz 4: Chapter 5: Social Structure

Chapter 6: Social Interaction and Social Groups

Topic: Deviance and Social Control

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outlines 

Reading 

Assignment: Review Chapters 1-7

Study Guide: Thompson:

Chapter 7: Deviance and Social Control
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March 2

Quiz 5: Chapter 7: Deviance and Social Control

First Exam: Lectures and Handouts:

Weeks 1 through 5

Gelles: Chapters 1-7

Reading Gelles: Chapter 8: Social Stratification

Assignments:

Macionis: 

Reading #30

Kingsley Davis and Wilbert Moore: "Some Principles of Stratification," with a response by Melvin Tumin

Reading #31

Robert B. Reich: "The Global Economy: Consequences for U. S. Inequality"
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March 9

No Quiz

Topic: Social Stratification

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outlines 

Reading Gelles: 

Assignments:

Chapter 9: Racial and Ethnic Stratification

Macionis: 

Reading #33

 Burghart Du Bois: "The Souls of Black Folks" W.E. 

Reading #34

William Julius Wilson, "The Black Ghetto Underclass"

Reading #35

William O'Hare: "The Rise of Hispanic Affluence"

Reading #36

Terry Huffman: "The Transculturation of Native American College Students"

Study Guide: Thompson: 

Chapter 8 (Social Stratification)
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March 16

Quiz 6: Chapter 8: Social Stratification

Topic: Racial and Ethnic Stratification

In-Class 

Reading Activity: American Experience: Holocaust Anticipation Guide

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outlines 

Written Preview of Chapter 9 (Due Next Week)

Reading Gelles: 

Assignments:

Chapter 10: Gender Stratification

Macionis: 

Reading #37

Margaret Mead: "Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies"

Reading #38

Naomi Wolf: "The Beauty Myth"

Reading #39

Stephanie Riger: "Why Many Women Don't Report Sexual Harassment"

Study Guide: Thompson: 

Chapter 9: Racial and Ethnic Stratification
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March 23

Quiz 7: Chapter 9: Racial and Ethnic Stratification

Topic: Gender Stratification

In-Class 

Reading Activity: Rape (Case Study and Videotape) Anticipation Guide

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outline

Reading Activity: Reviving Ophelia: Saving Selves of Adolescent Girls--Book and Video Notes 

Reading Gelles: 

Assignments: Chapter 11: Family

Macionis: 

Reading #51

Norval D. Glen: "Are Families Really Important?"

Study Guide: Thompson: 

Chapter 10: Gender Stratification
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March 30

Quiz 8: Chapter 10: Gender Stratification

Topic: Family

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outline 

Reading Gelles: 

Assignments: Chapter 12: Education

Macionis: 

Reading #57

David A. Karp and William C. Yoels: "Why Don't College Students Participate?"

Study Guide: Thompson: 

Chapter 11: Family
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April 6

Quiz 9: Chapter 11: Family

Topic: Education

In-Class Writing/ 

Reading Activity: Education Journal

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outlines

Reading Review Chapters 8-12

Assignment:

Study Guide: Thompson: 

Chapter 12: Education
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April 13

Quiz 10: Chapter 12: Education

Second Exam: Lectures and Handouts :

Weeks 6 through 11

Gelles: Chapters 8-12

Reading Gelles: Chapter 13: Religion

Assignments:

Macionis: Reading #54

Kenneth A.  Briggs: "Evangelicals in America"

Reading #55

Jane ISmith: "Women and Islam"

Sociology 120 Dr. Botz
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April 27 No Quiz 

Topic: Religion

Reading Gelles: Chapter 14: Politics

Assignments:

Macionis: Reading #47

C. Wright Mills: "The Power Elite"

Reading #48

Catharine A. MacKinnon: "Pornography: Morality or Politics?

Study Guide: Thompson: Chapter 13: Religion 
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May 4

Quiz 11: Chapter 13: Religion

Topic: Politics

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outline 

Reading Gelles: Chapter 15: The Economy /Work

Assignments:

Study Guide: Thompson: Chapter 14: Politics 
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May 11

Quiz 12: Chapter 14: Politics

Topics: The Economy and Work

Reading Chapter 16: Population, Global Ecology and Assignments: Urbanization

Chapter 17: Collective Behavior/Social Movements

Macionis: Reading #45 James D. Woods: "The Corporate Closet"

Reading #46 Mary Romero: "Maid in the USA

Study Guide: Thompson: 

Chapter 15: The Economy and Work
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May 18

Quiz 12: Chapter 15: The Economy and Work

Topics: Population, Global Ecology and

Urbanization

Collective Behavior and Social Movements

Homework: Reading Activity: Review Chapter Outlines 

Study Guide: Thompson: 

Chapter 16: Population, Global Ecology and Urbanization

Chapter 17: Collective Behavior and Social Movements

Reading

Assignment: Review Chapters 13-17
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Final Examination Week

May 25 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Quiz: Chapter 16: Population, Global Ecology and Urbanization

Chapter 17: Collective Behavior and Social Movements

Third Exam: Lectures and Handouts :

Weeks 12 through 16

Gelles: Chapters 13-17
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The schedule and procedures in this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances

This course adheres to the policies outlined in the Cuyamaca College catalogue.  For further information, see Academic Policies stated in the catalogue

-Dates to Remember-

February

February 3: College Hour 11:30 am to 12:30 pm

February 5: ABSOLUTELY LAST DAY TO ADD A CLASS Be sure to register so you aren't disappointed!

February 18, 19: Holiday: Lincoln Day

February 21: Holiday: Washington Day

February 26: Last Day to Apply for Credit/No Credit

March

March 7: College Hour: 6 pm to 7 pm

March 14: Professional Development Day (No Classes) 

April

April 5: College Hour: 10 am to 11 am

April 15: Last Day to Drop Semester Length 

Classes

April 17-22: Holiday: Spring Recess

May

May 1: College Hour: 2 pmto 3 pm

May 20-30: Final Exams

May 29: Holiday: Memorial Day

May 31: Commencement 
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  Updated July 01, 2013